We Have a Situation on our Hands

Girl Effect We have a situation on our handsI am tired of the news; fake or otherwise.  I want to scream to all politicians and media outlets, “We Have a Situation on our Hands!”  It is time we do something about it.  It is time I do something about it.

Have you heard of the Sustainable Development Goals?   They set out to achieve three extraordinary things by 2030—ending poverty, combating climate change, and fighting injustice and inequality.  

Global GoalsIf the Global Goals are to be achieved by 2030 we’ve got a lot of work to do! We must turn our ideas into action.  

My personal belief is that if you see someone who needs help, help them. It is your responsibility to do so.  It is my responsibility.  It is our responsibility.

These Global Goals cause us to think beyond ourselves, to stretch out of our comfort zone, and to make sacrifices so that others can have opportunities to thrive as we have.  (I’ll leave that as ‘we’ because if you are reading this #1 You speak English #2 You are literate and #3 You have access to internet.  You already have SO much going for you!)

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It is my responsibility to take on the Global Goals and I am doing so in my own way.   My focus is on the following goals: #4. Quality Education and #5. Gender Equality because of my ability to help in these categories.  I can use my resources, experiences, and networks to make a difference.  That is why I am going to Tanzania to volunteer at a rural secondary school.

Global Goals #4
Global Goal #4 Quality Education

I saw this video years ago.  The Girl Effect: The Clock Is Ticking. I encourage you to take 3 minute and 4 seconds to watch it.  The video articulates evidence from a growing body of research that educating young girls improves entire communities.  

I believe in the Global Goals.  I believe in Quality Education.  I believe in Gender Equality. I believe I have a role in achieving these goals.   Join me in being part of the solution.

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Project Wezesha students hard at work on their studies.

Mgaraganza, Tanzania

I will live and work in Mgaraganza, Tanzania.  I recently learned that in Tanzanian, primary school is taught in Swahili. Secondary school is taught in English. However, not all of the teachers are proficient in English, and many of the students understand it. The government standard is 40 students to one teacher, but due to a lack of teachers and classrooms, at times there are 120 students to one teacher.

A report from a university student from the United States conducting ethnographic research in Mgaraganza stated that the teachers had the following amount of experience: “5 months, 5 months, 4 yrs, 5 yrs, 7 yrs, 5 months, 5 months, 8 yrs, 2 yrs.” Even the most skilled English as a Second Language teacher, with years of experience, would have a difficult time meeting the needs of a classroom full of 120 students. These students need more than more teachers. They need chairs to sit on, desks to work out, pencils to write with, paper to take notes. There are so many needs in this world.  Map of Tanzania